Panic! At The Disco Relentlessly Rock At KROQ’s Weenie Roast Festival

Swearing slurs, bemusing behaviours and pop-punk family reunions. Panic! At The Disco dazzled and delivered a borderline contentious act of uncontrollable crowd interactions and candid discussion admitting actions, with a blazing display of illustrious instrumentals and charismatic dispositions at Alternative radio KROQ’s annual Weenie Roast Festival.

Source: KROQ

Backstage at the StubHub Centre in Carson California, a congregation of pop-punk supremacy sent social media into a state of reminiscent satisfaction. A snap shot of the two co-headliners on the roast’s arrangement of Panic! At The Disco frontman and lead broadway panjandrum Brendon Urie and Blink-182 bassist and Hi My Name Is Mark businessman Mark Hoppus, alongside performing bands Thirty Seconds To Mars, Mike Shinoda and AWOLNATION at the 26th instalment of the festival. Posting the picture to Hoppus’ Instagram profile of the pair, Urie unbelievable elaborated on his patent happiness between moments of Blink stage banter with the ‘This Is Gospel’ songwriter stating “He posted a picture where I got to look like a mini Mark”.

Source: KROQ

Perennial returnees to the Weenie Roast, a mid may festival famous for its modish rock radio station KROQ-FM, co-headliners Panic! At The Disco’s explicit engagement and perplexing performance conjured up a chaotic, captivating and conventional manifestation of the collectives live charade. Opening with ‘Silver Lining’ swear words and blurred out beeps were not in short supply, used throughout Urie’s openly honest divulges slotted between songs and in ‘Silver Lining’ even rivalled Kanye West’s All Day’ BRIT Awards performance in 2015 with the multi talented musician discussing drug type substances. As the 70’s roller skating scene lyrics suggest, singing about the positive outcomes of a plethora of situations with everything “Coming up cherries on top” backed by a big brass band and arbitrary alludes to positive hardcore Thursday scremo stunts, set a scene far from the productions sharada of primary neon coloured lighting and rainbow streamers represented more congruously in LGBT pop-punk perimeters anthem ‘Girls/Girls/Boys’.

Source: KROQ

A track apropos to having limitless bounds of freedom to express being whoever you are in the confines of choice words “Love is not a choice” was a setup full of smiles, strong singing in comparison to the tenor’s warn and weak vocal washout in ‘Victorious’, before bouncing back with a extensive reflexology delving deep into his tone depths. As pride flags compiled of celebrities faces whom are synonymous to the community of openly LGBTQ identities emerged, fitting in with the songs themes of celebrating the courage and diversification within this initialism, following on from a fiery moonlit depiction of “A girl I knew growing up in Las Vegas” the synopsis to Too Weird To Live Too Rare To Die classic ‘Miss Jackson’.

Source: KROQ

Vowed to be a story of mistrust and manipulation with backflips, bows and mockery on his own accord, Brendon Urie’s extra ordinary charasmaticness and completely curious phases where their most pronounced, with the supposed 27,000 capacity crowd wailing under the intro’s chants challenged ‘I Write Sins Not Tragedies’ “I chime in with a haven’t you people ever heard of closing a goddam door?” frenzy gained from every Panic! performance derived from the songs royalty amongst the emo trinity and 2000’s music movement in pop-rock and pop-punk wave. Whereas closer ‘Say Amen (Saturday Night)’ saw an actual Saturday night go out in expressive style and extraordinary substance, a song supplementary to sing out to paint a religiously inclined image for Pray For The Wicked set to be released on 22nd June.

Watch Panic! At The Disco’s performance at KROQ’s Weenie Roast here:

Panic! At The Disco Live @ KROQ’s Weenie Roast 2018

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